Determining, which electrically charged fluids will sink on an electrically charged sphere?

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AlternateGravity
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Determining, which electrically charged fluids will sink on an electrically charged sphere?

Post by AlternateGravity » Sat Jun 08, 2019 4:54 pm

There is an electrically charged sphere with a significant electrical charge, and in which the mass and radius are such that the gravitational acceleration from the sphere is negligible. Also any tidal forces on the sphere are negligible and the sphere is in a near inertial if not an inertial reference frame.

In this case the electric force acting on any fluid depends only on the electric charge of the fluid, the electric charge of the sphere, the radius of the sphere, and the electric constant, and so the electric force density of any fluid depends only on the electric charge density of the fluid, the electric charge of the sphere, the radius of the sphere, and the electric constant. The resistance to acceleration for any fluid depends only on the mass of the fluid, and so the resistance to acceleration density for any fluid depends only on the mass density of the fluid. This means that if for instance fluid 1 has a greater electric charge density than fluid 2 but fluid 2 has a greater mass density than fluid 1 then fluid will have a greater force density than fluid 2 but fluid 2 will have a greater resistance to acceleration density than fluid 1.

In order to determine whether fluid 1 sinks or fluid 2 sinks would it be correct to divide the electric charge density of fluid 1 by the mass density of fluid 2, and then divide the electric charge density of fluid 2 by the mass density of fluid 1 and then figure out which ratio is greater?
Gravitons would be my favorite particle as their existence could prove extra dimensions.

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testtubegames
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Re: Determining, which electrically charged fluids will sink on an electrically charged sphere?

Post by testtubegames » Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:14 pm

This is a very complicated question. And I can't say I know the answer.

The one point that stands out to me is: why does the (mass) density of the fluids matter?

Or put another way, when I see oil floating on top of water, neither of them are accelerating.

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